ThermaScan
Treatment

Photodynamic Light Acne Laser Vancouver | Acne Laser Therapy Winnipeg | Photodynamic Therapy For Acne Vancouver | Acne Light Treatment Vancouver

Get Your Thermascan Acne Treatment In Vancouver!

ThermaScan is a non-invasive laser treatment used to reduce the appearance of active acne, acne scars, fine lines and wrinkles.

It clears and rejuvenates skin using thermal (heat energy) which breaks up the damage deep within the skin without affecting the surface; to clear imperfections and stimulate the growth of new collagen. In the treatment of acne, the laser gently heats the sebaceous glands in the dermis to reduce the excess oil responsible for blocked pores and inflammation.

Clinical studies demonstrate that when collagen is stimulated with precise heat, the skin begins to act and look younger to repair and clear acne, wrinkles, scars and pigmentation for a more even skin tone with enhanced clarity and firmness. ThermaScan is effective on the face and upper neck—and when targeting acne, is often applied to the back, chest and shoulders where breakouts are common.

Our ND YAG Q-switched laser system offers exceptional results with no recovery period or downtime—and is considered one of the safest laser technologies available.

Before & After Treatment Shots

Before
After

Thermascan Acne Light Therapy Treatments at a Glance

001 like
Best Results

4-6 Treatments

002 fast
Duration of Results

Months

003 vaccine
Anesthetics

None

001 like
Best
Results

4-6 Treatments

002 fast
Duration
of Results

Months

003 vaccine
Anesthetics

None

007 caution
Risks

Low

007 caution
Risks

Low

clock
Procedure Time

30 Minutes

005 team
Back To Work

Right away

clock
Procedure
Time

30 Minutes

005 team
Back To
Work

Right away

Benefits of ThermaScan Treatment

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Safe with no downtime
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Reduces active acne and inflammation
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Smooths and plumps atrophic acne scars and skin depressions
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Softens lines & wrinkles to rejuvenate appearance
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Improves skin texture
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Strengthens skin for greater resilience

Treatable Conditions

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Active acne
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Acne scars
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Wrinkles
icon1
Skin texture

Photodynamic Acne Light Therapy Vancouver FAQ

Treatment time is dependent on the size of the area being treated, but is generally completed in 15-30 minutes. ThermaScan in a no downtime procedure, so you can return to your usual activities immediately.

ThermaScan is a gentle procedure that is usually well tolerated. You will feel a snapping sensation (comparable to a rubber band) and your skin may feel warm. Topical anesthetic is usually not required, but may be applied to sensitive areas.

For best results, ThermaScan treatments are performed in a series of 4-6, depending on the condition being treated.

Results are progressive over the course of 3-6 months as new collagen forms. Acne patients generally see an improvement around the third treatment, with a marked decrease in the severity of acne lesions present. Our physicians at EverYoung will suggest a treatment plan to maintain your results.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is generally considered safe when performed by trained healthcare professionals. However, like any medical procedure, it may have potential risks and side effects, which should be discussed with your healthcare provider before undergoing PDT.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) light offers targeted treatment for various medical conditions, including certain cancers and skin conditions, by activating photosensitive drugs to selectively destroy abnormal cells. It is minimally invasive, often less damaging to surrounding healthy tissue compared to other treatments, and can be a viable option for localized disease management.

Light therapy, while generally safe and effective for many conditions, can have some disadvantages. Prolonged exposure to certain wavelengths of light, especially ultraviolet (UV) light, can increase the risk of skin damage and potential eye damage if safety precautions are not followed, and it may not be suitable for all individuals due to skin type or medical conditions.

The healing time after photodynamic therapy (PDT) for skin conditions can vary depending on the individual, the specific treatment area, and the intensity of the therapy. Generally, it may take a few days to a couple of weeks for the skin to fully recover, with some redness, peeling, or discomfort during the initial days post-treatment.

The depth of penetration for photodynamic therapy (PDT) can vary depending on factors such as the type of photosensitizing agent used and the specific condition being treated. In general, PDT typically affects tissues and cells within a range of about 1 to 2 millimeters beneath the skin’s surface, making it most effective for treating superficial skin conditions and some shallow tumors.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is primarily used to treat conditions like skin cancer, acne, and certain skin lesions. While it may help improve skin texture and appearance, it’s not typically used specifically to shrink pores, and its effects on pore size are secondary to its primary therapeutic goals.

Long-term side effects of photodynamic therapy (PDT) are generally rare but can include prolonged skin sensitivity to light, which may necessitate avoiding sun exposure for an extended period. In some cases, changes in skin pigmentation, scarring, or persistent redness may occur, but these effects are usually mild and resolve over time.

During photodynamic therapy (PDT), it’s important to protect treated areas from direct sunlight for at least 48 hours following the procedure, as the skin may be highly sensitive to light. Patients should also follow any specific aftercare instructions provided by their healthcare provider, which may include the use of sunscreen and avoiding abrasive skincare products to minimize potential side effects.

After photodynamic therapy (PDT), it’s important to avoid direct sunlight and bright indoor lights for at least 48 hours, as your skin will be highly sensitive to light. Additionally, you should avoid any harsh or abrasive skincare products that could irritate the treated area and follow your healthcare provider’s specific post-treatment instructions for optimal healing and results.

After photodynamic therapy (PDT), you should protect your treated skin from direct sunlight by wearing protective clothing and using a broad-spectrum sunscreen with a high SPF. Additionally, follow any specific skincare instructions provided by your healthcare provider, which may include gentle cleansing and moisturizing to promote proper healing and minimize the risk of adverse reactions.

After photodynamic therapy (PDT), it’s generally recommended to avoid direct sun exposure for at least 48 hours, but this duration may vary depending on your specific treatment and your healthcare provider’s instructions.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) typically involves the use of specialized medical devices such as lasers or light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to activate photosensitizing agents applied to the skin or administered internally. These devices emit the appropriate wavelength of light to activate the photosensitizer and initiate the therapeutic process.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is primarily used for treating certain types of skin cancers, including basal cell carcinoma and actinic keratoses, as well as various dermatological conditions such as acne and psoriasis.

Exposure to sunlight or bright indoor lights after photodynamic therapy (PDT) can lead to a heightened risk of severe skin reactions, including burning, blistering, and increased sensitivity. It’s crucial to avoid sun exposure and follow your healthcare provider’s recommendations for post-PDT care to prevent such reactions.

After photodynamic therapy (PDT), you should follow your healthcare provider’s specific post-treatment instructions regarding skincare, but typically, gentle cleansing of the treated area is allowed, usually within 24 hours post-PDT. However, abrasive or harsh skincare products should be avoided to prevent irritation.

The duration of light exposure during photodynamic therapy (PDT) can vary depending on the specific condition being treated and the type of photosensitizer used. Typically, the light exposure lasts for several minutes to an hour.

Using a computer after photodynamic therapy (PDT) is generally safe, as long as the screen brightness and glare do not irritate your treated skin. However, it’s essential to follow any specific post-PDT instructions provided by your healthcare provider to ensure proper healing and avoid discomfort.

Yes, it’s common for the skin to peel and experience mild to moderate redness and discomfort for a few days to a couple of weeks after photodynamic therapy (PDT), depending on the specific treatment and individual skin sensitivity. These effects are typically part of the healing process and should improve with time.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses a chemical reaction involving the interaction of a photosensitizing agent, a specific wavelength of light, and oxygen to produce a therapeutic effect. The photosensitizer is activated by the light, which then generates reactive oxygen species that can destroy targeted cells, such as cancer cells or certain skin conditions.

One of the challenges with photodynamic therapy (PDT) is that it requires the precise activation of photosensitizing agents, which may not always penetrate deeply into tissues, limiting its effectiveness for certain conditions located deep within the body. Additionally, PDT can cause skin sensitivity to light, and post-treatment care is essential to prevent adverse reactions from sun exposure.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) primarily targets active acne and can help improve skin texture and reduce the appearance of some acne scars, but it may not completely remove deep or extensive scars. Multiple sessions may be required for noticeable results, and individual responses can vary.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) can be effective for treating certain types of acne, particularly when other treatments have not been successful. It helps by reducing acne-causing bacteria and controlling oil production, leading to improved skin texture and a reduction in acne lesions.

After photodynamic therapy (PDT), it’s generally advisable to avoid direct sunlight for at least 48 hours due to heightened skin sensitivity to light. If you do go outside during this period, wear protective clothing and sunscreen to shield the treated area.

In dermatology, photodynamic therapy (PDT) is commonly used to treat various skin conditions, including actinic keratoses, acne, certain types of skin cancers (such as basal cell carcinoma), and photorejuvenation for improving skin texture and appearance. It involves the application of a photosensitizing agent followed by exposure to specific wavelengths of light to target and treat the affected skin.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) was first approved for medical use in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the 1990s, primarily for the treatment of certain types of skin cancer and pre-cancerous lesions like actinic keratoses. Since then, it has been used for various other medical and dermatological purposes.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) does not have an incubation period in the same way that infectious diseases do. Instead, PDT involves the application of a photosensitizing agent followed by a specific interval before exposure to light, typically ranging from minutes to a few hours, depending on the treatment protocol.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) can be effective at reducing brown spots or pigmented lesions, particularly when they are pre-cancerous or related to certain skin conditions. However, the extent of improvement can vary, and multiple sessions may be needed for optimal results.

For acne scars, fractional laser therapy and intense pulsed light (IPL) therapy are often considered effective options, as they can help stimulate collagen production and improve skin texture. The choice between them depends on the type and severity of the scars, and it’s best to consult a dermatologist for personalized recommendations.

One of the most common complications of photodynamic therapy (PDT) is skin photosensitivity, which can lead to redness, swelling, and discomfort in the treated area when exposed to light, particularly sunlight. Proper post-treatment care and sun protection can help minimize this side effect.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) can be effective for treating acne, especially when other treatments have been unsuccessful. It works by targeting the bacteria and oil glands associated with acne, leading to reduced inflammation and improved skin texture.

Contraindications for photodynamic therapy (PDT) may include a known allergy to the photosensitizing agent used, certain blood disorders, or a history of photosensitivity reactions. Additionally, PDT should be avoided during pregnancy and in individuals with certain autoimmune diseases or porphyria.

The main indication for photodynamic therapy (PDT) is the treatment of certain types of skin cancers, particularly superficial basal cell carcinoma and actinic keratoses. It is also used for various dermatological conditions, including acne and photorejuvenation.

The most common form of photodynamic therapy (PDT) used in dermatology involves the application of a topical photosensitizing agent called aminolevulinic acid (ALA) or its esterified form, methyl aminolevulinate (MAL), followed by exposure to a specific wavelength of light to target and treat skin conditions.

Following photodynamic therapy (PDT), the skin becomes abnormally sensitive to light, particularly sunlight and bright indoor lights. This photosensitivity can lead to severe skin reactions if not adequately protected, such as sunburn-like symptoms and blistering.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is best for treating skin conditions, including certain types of skin cancers like basal cell carcinoma and actinic keratoses, as well as other dermatological concerns such as acne, photodamaged skin, and precancerous lesions. It can effectively target and treat abnormal or damaged skin cells while preserving healthy tissue.

After photodynamic therapy (PDT), the treated skin area may initially appear red, swollen, and possibly blistered, resembling a sunburn. Over time, the skin typically undergoes peeling and healing, resulting in improved texture and a reduction in the treated condition, such as acne lesions or precancerous lesions.

The success rate of photodynamic therapy (PDT) can vary depending on the specific condition being treated, its severity, and individual factors. PDT has shown effectiveness in treating certain skin cancers, precancerous lesions, and dermatological concerns, with success rates ranging from 70% to over 90% in some cases, but outcomes can vary. It’s essential to consult with a healthcare provider to determine the suitability and expected results for your particular condition.

The level of discomfort during photodynamic therapy (PDT) can vary from person to person and depends on the specific condition being treated. Some individuals may experience mild to moderate discomfort during the procedure, which typically subsides shortly after the treatment is complete.

The depth of penetration for photodynamic therapy (PDT) can vary depending on factors such as the type of photosensitizing agent used and the specific condition being treated. Generally, PDT typically affects tissues and cells within a range of about 1 to 2 millimeters beneath the skin’s surface, making it most effective for treating superficial skin conditions and some shallow tumors.

After photodynamic therapy (PDT), you can usually watch TV, as long as the screen brightness and glare do not irritate your treated skin. However, it’s essential to follow your healthcare provider’s specific post-treatment instructions for proper healing and comfort.

Dark spots that may appear after photodynamic therapy (PDT) can result from the treatment itself or as part of the healing process. They can be temporary and typically resolve over time as the skin heals, but it’s essential to monitor any changes and consult your healthcare provider if you have concerns about persistent or unusual pigmentation.

Pain or discomfort after photodynamic therapy (PDT) is usually temporary and can last for a few hours to a couple of days. It tends to diminish as the treated area heals, but the duration and intensity can vary depending on the individual and the specific condition being treated.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) can improve the appearance of the skin, particularly in terms of texture and reduction of some skin issues like fine lines and sun damage. While it may help you achieve a more youthful-looking complexion, its primary purpose is to treat specific dermatological concerns, and individual results can vary.

Yes, photodynamic therapy (PDT) can stimulate collagen production in the treated area, which can contribute to improved skin texture and appearance. The increased collagen can help reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, making the skin look more youthful.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is generally considered a low-risk procedure for scarring. However, there is a small risk of scarring, particularly in individuals with certain skin types or when PDT is used to treat deep-seated conditions. It’s essential to follow post-treatment care instructions and consult with a healthcare provider for proper wound healing to minimize the risk of scarring.

The recurrence of dark spots after treatment, including photodynamic therapy (PDT), can depend on various factors such as the underlying cause of the spots, sun exposure, and individual skin characteristics. In some cases, dark spots may reappear over time, especially if the root cause is not addressed or if proper sun protection is not maintained.

The cream used in photodynamic therapy (PDT) typically contains a photosensitizing agent, such as aminolevulinic acid (ALA) or methyl aminolevulinate (MAL), which is applied to the skin. This cream is left on the skin for a specific period before being activated by light to target and treat the desired skin condition.

Swimming after photodynamic therapy (PDT) is generally not recommended for at least 48 hours, as the treated skin can be sensitive to water and chlorine, which may increase the risk of irritation or infection. It’s crucial to follow your healthcare provider’s specific post-PDT instructions to ensure proper healing.

Painless PDT is a variation of photodynamic therapy (PDT) that aims to reduce discomfort during the procedure. It typically involves using a different photosensitizing agent, such as a gel formulation of aminolevulinic acid (ALA), which may be less irritating to the skin, resulting in a more comfortable experience for the patient.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) can help improve the appearance of wrinkles and fine lines by stimulating collagen production and rejuvenating the skin’s texture. However, it may be more effective for milder wrinkles and is often used in combination with other cosmetic treatments for more pronounced signs of aging.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) can be effective at reducing the appearance of freckles, particularly if they are caused by sun damage or are related to certain skin conditions. However, individual responses can vary, and multiple sessions may be required for noticeable results.

Photodynamic Acne Light Therapy Vancouver FAQ

Treatment time is dependent on the size of the area being treated, but is generally completed in 15-30 minutes. ThermaScan in a no downtime procedure, so you can return to your usual activities immediately.

ThermaScan is a gentle procedure that is usually well tolerated. You will feel a snapping sensation (comparable to a rubber band) and your skin may feel warm. Topical anesthetic is usually not required, but may be applied to sensitive areas.

For best results, ThermaScan treatments are performed in a series of 4-6, depending on the condition being treated.

Results are progressive over the course of 3-6 months as new collagen forms. Acne patients generally see an improvement around the third treatment, with a marked decrease in the severity of acne lesions present. Our physicians at EverYoung will suggest a treatment plan to maintain your results.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is generally considered safe when performed by trained healthcare professionals. However, like any medical procedure, it may have potential risks and side effects, which should be discussed with your healthcare provider before undergoing PDT.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) light offers targeted treatment for various medical conditions, including certain cancers and skin conditions, by activating photosensitive drugs to selectively destroy abnormal cells. It is minimally invasive, often less damaging to surrounding healthy tissue compared to other treatments, and can be a viable option for localized disease management.

Light therapy, while generally safe and effective for many conditions, can have some disadvantages. Prolonged exposure to certain wavelengths of light, especially ultraviolet (UV) light, can increase the risk of skin damage and potential eye damage if safety precautions are not followed, and it may not be suitable for all individuals due to skin type or medical conditions.

The healing time after photodynamic therapy (PDT) for skin conditions can vary depending on the individual, the specific treatment area, and the intensity of the therapy. Generally, it may take a few days to a couple of weeks for the skin to fully recover, with some redness, peeling, or discomfort during the initial days post-treatment.

The depth of penetration for photodynamic therapy (PDT) can vary depending on factors such as the type of photosensitizing agent used and the specific condition being treated. In general, PDT typically affects tissues and cells within a range of about 1 to 2 millimetres beneath the skin’s surface, making it most effective for treating superficial skin conditions and some shallow tumours.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is primarily used to treat conditions like skin cancer, acne, and certain skin lesions. While it may help improve skin texture and appearance, it’s not typically used specifically to shrink pores, and its effects on pore size are secondary to its primary therapeutic goals.

Long-term side effects of photodynamic therapy (PDT) are generally rare but can include prolonged skin sensitivity to light, which may necessitate avoiding sun exposure for an extended period. In some cases, changes in skin pigmentation, scarring, or persistent redness may occur, but these effects are usually mild and resolve over time.

During photodynamic therapy (PDT), it’s important to protect treated areas from direct sunlight for at least 48 hours following the procedure, as the skin may be highly sensitive to light. Patients should also follow any specific aftercare instructions provided by their healthcare provider, which may include the use of sunscreen and avoiding abrasive skin care products to minimize potential side effects.

After photodynamic therapy (PDT), it’s important to avoid direct sunlight and bright indoor lights for at least 48 hours, as your skin will be highly sensitive to light. Additionally, you should avoid any harsh or abrasive skincare products that could irritate the treated area and follow your healthcare provider’s specific post-treatment instructions for optimal healing and results.

After photodynamic therapy (PDT), you should protect your treated skin from direct sunlight by wearing protective clothing and using a broad-spectrum sunscreen with a high SPF. Additionally, follow any specific skincare instructions provided by your healthcare provider, which may include gentle cleansing and moisturizing to promote proper healing and minimize the risk of adverse reactions

After photodynamic therapy (PDT), it’s generally recommended to avoid direct sun exposure for at least 48 hours, but this duration may vary depending on your specific treatment and your healthcare provider’s instructions.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) typically involves the use of specialized medical devices such as lasers or light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to activate photosensitizing agents applied to the skin or administered internally. These devices emit the appropriate wavelength of light to activate the photosensitizer and initiate the therapeutic process.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is primarily used for treating certain types of skin cancers, including basal cell carcinoma and actinic keratoses, as well as various dermatological conditions such as acne and psoriasis.

Exposure to sunlight or bright indoor lights after photodynamic therapy (PDT) can lead to a heightened risk of severe skin reactions, including burning, blistering, and increased sensitivity. It’s crucial to avoid sun exposure and follow your healthcare provider’s recommendations for post-PDT care to prevent such reactions.

After photodynamic therapy (PDT), you should follow your healthcare provider’s specific post-treatment instructions regarding skincare, but typically, gentle cleansing of the treated area is allowed, usually within 24 hours post-PDT. However, abrasive or harsh skincare products should be avoided to prevent irritation.

The duration of light exposure during photodynamic therapy (PDT) can vary depending on the specific condition being treated and the type of photosensitizer used. Typically, the light exposure lasts for several minutes to an hour.

Using a computer after photodynamic therapy (PDT) is generally safe, as long as the screen brightness and glare do not irritate your treated skin. However, it’s essential to follow any specific post-PDT instructions provided by your healthcare provider to ensure proper healing and avoid discomfort.

Yes, it’s common for the skin to peel and experience mild to moderate redness and discomfort for a few days to a couple of weeks after photodynamic therapy (PDT), depending on the specific treatment and individual skin sensitivity. These effects are typically part of the healing process and should improve with time.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses a chemical reaction involving the interaction of a photosensitizing agent, a specific wavelength of light, and oxygen to produce a therapeutic effect. The photosensitizer is activated by the light, which then generates reactive oxygen species that can destroy targeted cells, such as cancer cells or certain skin conditions.

One of the challenges with photodynamic therapy (PDT) is that it requires the precise activation of photosensitizing agents, which may not always penetrate deeply into tissues, limiting its effectiveness for certain conditions located deep within the body. Additionally, PDT can cause skin sensitivity to light, and post-treatment care is essential to prevent adverse reactions from sun exposure.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) primarily targets active acne and can help improve skin texture and reduce the appearance of some acne scars, but it may not completely remove deep or extensive scars. Multiple sessions may be required for noticeable results, and individual responses can vary.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) can be effective for treating certain types of acne, particularly when other treatments have not been successful. It helps by reducing acne-causing bacteria and controlling oil production, leading to improved skin texture and a reduction in acne lesions.

After photodynamic therapy (PDT), it’s generally advisable to avoid direct sunlight for at least 48 hours due to heightened skin sensitivity to light. If you do go outside during this period, wear protective clothing and sunscreen to shield the treated area.

In dermatology, photodynamic therapy (PDT) is commonly used to treat various skin conditions, including actinic keratoses, acne, certain types of skin cancers (such as basal cell carcinoma), and photorejuvenation for improving skin texture and appearance. It involves the application of a photosensitizing agent followed by exposure to specific wavelengths of light to target and treat the affected skin.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) was first approved for medical use in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the 1990s, primarily for the treatment of certain types of skin cancer and pre-cancerous lesions like actinic keratoses. Since then, it has been used for various other medical and dermatological purposes

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) does not have an incubation period in the same way that infectious diseases do. Instead, PDT involves the application of a photosensitizing agent followed by a specific interval before exposure to light, typically ranging from minutes to a few hours, depending on the treatment protocol.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) can be effective at reducing brown spots or pigmented lesions, particularly when they are pre-cancerous or related to certain skin conditions. However, the extent of improvement can vary, and multiple sessions may be needed for optimal results.

For acne scars, fractional laser therapy and intense pulsed light (IPL) therapy are often considered effective options, as they can help stimulate collagen production and improve skin texture. The choice between them depends on the type and severity of the scars, and it’s best to consult a dermatologist for personalized recommendations.

One of the most common complications of photodynamic therapy (PDT) is skin photosensitivity, which can lead to redness, swelling, and discomfort in the treated area when exposed to light, particularly sunlight. Proper post-treatment care and sun protection can help minimize this side effect.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) can be effective for treating acne, especially when other treatments have been unsuccessful. It works by targeting the bacteria and oil glands associated with acne, leading to reduced inflammation and improved skin texture.

Contraindications for photodynamic therapy (PDT) may include a known allergy to the photosensitizing agent used, certain blood disorders, or a history of photosensitivity reactions. Additionally, PDT should be avoided during pregnancy and in individuals with certain autoimmune diseases or porphyria.

The main indication for photodynamic therapy (PDT) is the treatment of certain types of skin cancers, particularly superficial basal cell carcinoma and actinic keratoses. It is also used for various dermatological conditions, including acne and photorejuvenation.

The most common form of photodynamic therapy (PDT) used in dermatology involves the application of a topical photosensitizing agent called aminolevulinic acid (ALA) or its esterified form, methyl aminolevulinate (MAL), followed by exposure to a specific wavelength of light to target and treat skin conditions. 

Following photodynamic therapy (PDT), the skin becomes abnormally sensitive to light, particularly sunlight and bright indoor lights. This photosensitivity can lead to severe skin reactions if not adequately protected, such as sunburn-like symptoms and blistering. 

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is best for treating skin conditions, including certain types of skin cancers like basal cell carcinoma and actinic keratoses, as well as other dermatological concerns such as acne, photodamaged skin, and precancerous lesions. It can effectively target and treat abnormal or damaged skin cells while preserving healthy tissue.

After photodynamic therapy (PDT), the treated skin area may initially appear red, swollen, and possibly blistered, resembling a sunburn. Over time, the skin typically undergoes peeling and healing, resulting in improved texture and a reduction in the treated condition, such as acne lesions or precancerous lesions.

The success rate of photodynamic therapy (PDT) can vary depending on the specific condition being treated, its severity, and individual factors. PDT has shown effectiveness in treating certain skin cancers, precancerous lesions, and dermatological concerns, with success rates ranging from 70% to over 90% in some cases, but outcomes can vary. It’s essential to consult with a healthcare provider to determine the suitability and expected results for your particular condition.

The level of discomfort during photodynamic therapy (PDT) can vary from person to person and depends on the specific condition being treated. Some individuals may experience mild to moderate discomfort during the procedure, which typically subsides shortly after the treatment is complete.

The depth of penetration for photodynamic therapy (PDT) can vary depending on factors such as the type of photosensitizing agent used and the specific condition being treated. Generally, PDT typically affects tissues and cells within a range of about 1 to 2 millimeters beneath the skin’s surface, making it most effective for treating superficial skin conditions and some shallow tumors.

After photodynamic therapy (PDT), you can usually watch TV, as long as the screen brightness and glare do not irritate your treated skin. However, it’s essential to follow your healthcare provider’s specific post-treatment instructions for proper healing and comfort.

Dark spots that may appear after photodynamic therapy (PDT) can result from the treatment itself or as part of the healing process. They can be temporary and typically resolve over time as the skin heals, but it’s essential to monitor any changes and consult your healthcare provider if you have concerns about persistent or unusual pigmentation.

Pain or discomfort after photodynamic therapy (PDT) is usually temporary and can last for a few hours to a couple of days. It tends to diminish as the treated area heals, but the duration and intensity can vary depending on the individual and the specific condition being treated.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) can improve the appearance of the skin, particularly in terms of texture and reduction of some skin issues like fine lines and sun damage. While it may help you achieve a more youthful-looking complexion, its primary purpose is to treat specific dermatological concerns, and individual results can vary.

Yes, photodynamic therapy (PDT) can stimulate collagen production in the treated area, which can contribute to improved skin texture and appearance. The increased collagen can help reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, making the skin look more youthful.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is generally considered a low-risk procedure for scarring. However, there is a small risk of scarring, particularly in individuals with certain skin types or when PDT is used to treat deep-seated conditions. It’s essential to follow post-treatment care instructions and consult with a healthcare provider for proper wound healing to minimize the risk of scarring.

The recurrence of dark spots after treatment, including photodynamic therapy (PDT), can depend on various factors such as the underlying cause of the spots, sun exposure, and individual skin characteristics. In some cases, dark spots may reappear over time, especially if the root cause is not addressed or if proper sun protection is not maintained.

The cream used in photodynamic therapy (PDT) typically contains a photosensitizing agent, such as aminolevulinic acid (ALA) or methyl aminolevulinate (MAL), which is applied to the skin. This cream is left on the skin for a specific period before being activated by light to target and treat the desired skin condition.

Swimming after photodynamic therapy (PDT) is generally not recommended for at least 48 hours, as the treated skin can be sensitive to water and chlorine, which may increase the risk of irritation or infection. It’s crucial to follow your healthcare provider’s specific post-PDT instructions to ensure proper healing.

Painless PDT is a variation of photodynamic therapy (PDT) that aims to reduce discomfort during the procedure. It typically involves using a different photosensitizing agent, such as a gel formulation of aminolevulinic acid (ALA), which may be less irritating to the skin, resulting in a more comfortable experience for the patient.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) can help improve the appearance of wrinkles and fine lines by stimulating collagen production and rejuvenating the skin’s texture. However, it may be more effective for milder wrinkles and is often used in combination with other cosmetic treatments for more pronounced signs of aging.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) can be effective at reducing the appearance of freckles, particularly if they are caused by sun damage or are related to certain skin conditions. However, individual responses can vary, and multiple sessions may be required for noticeable results.

ThermaScan FAQs

Treatment time is dependent on the size of the area being treated, but is generally completed in 15-30 minutes. ThermaScan in a no downtime procedure, so you can return to your usual activities immediately.

ThermaScan is a gentle procedure that is usually well tolerated. You will feel a snapping sensation (comparable to a rubber band) and your skin may feel warm. Topical anesthetic is usually not required, but may be applied to sensitive areas.

For best results, ThermaScan treatments are performed in a series of 4-6, depending on the condition being treated.

Results are progressive over the course of 3-6 months as new collagen forms. Acne patients generally see an improvement around the third treatment, with a marked decrease in the severity of acne lesions present. Our physicians at EverYoung will suggest a treatment plan to maintain your results.

Where to Find Us?

Downtown Vancouver

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Monday10:00am– 6pm

Tuesday10:00am–8pm

Wednesday10:00am–5pm

Thursday12:00pm–8pm

Friday10:00am–6pm

Saturday10:00am–6pm

Sunday10:00am–6pm

phone604-260-1238 (English)
phone778-682-7546 (Chinese)

Free Parking Available

GET DIRECTIONS

Metrotown, Burnaby

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Monday10:00am– 6pm

Tuesday10:00am–8pm

Wednesday10:00am–5pm

Thursday12:00pm–8pm

Friday10:00am–6pm

Saturday10:00am–6pm

Sunday10:00am–6pm

phone604-330-1335 (English)
phone778-682-7546 (Chinese)

Free Parking Available

GET DIRECTIONS

Port Coquitlam

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Monday10:00am-6pm

Tuesday10:00am-6pm

Wednesday10:00am-5pm

Thursday10:00am-6pm

Friday10:00am-6pm

Saturday10:00am-6pm

SundayClosed

phone604-243-3903 (English)
phone778-682-7546 (Chinese)

Free Parking Available

GET DIRECTIONS

North Vancouver

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MondayClosed

Tuesday10:00am–6pm

Wednesday10:00am–6pm

Thursday10:00pm–6pm

Friday10:00am–6pm

Saturday10:00am–6pm

SundayClosed

phone604-243-4284 (English)
phone778-682-7546 (Chinese)

Free Parking Available

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With locations in Downtown Vancouver, North Vancouver, Burnaby & Port Coquitlam, we proudly serve people throughout greater Vancouver and the lower mainland with all of their acne, skin and beauty needs. 

Contact us now to book an appointment.